Saljack Enterprises

Saljack Enterprises is a woman owned digital entertainment company. We are engaged in partnerships with innovative and creative talent around the world.

Rin's Room #34: Getting Your Game's Kickstarter Funded. Presented by Saljack Enterprises. Gaming. Animation. Media. Entertainment. Woman Owned.

Ah, the World Wide Web (does anyone even say that anymore?). Thanks to the Internet we can connect to someone halfway around the globe in just minutes. And thanks to websites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo, anyone with a great idea can raise the capital they need to turn that idea into reality.

The problem is, getting your project fully funded isn’t as easy as writing some random things and posting a quick mockup and hoping that the crowds will come. It takes a little more effort than that. And, hey–some creators just AREN’T marketers and aren’t sure where to start when getting the word out about their project. Here are a few steps you can take if you’re an indie developer hoping to fund the next great game-changer.


#1 Have a clear idea

Don’t plagiarize something. Make sure that your idea actually has an audience. If you take a look at the most-funded projects on Kickstarter, you can see that they’re all creative in their own way, have never been done before, and have few competitors. Confused about the last point?

Basically–offer something unique, and provide value to your customers. Successful projects have clear target audiences! Kickstarters aren’t charities like Gofundme. It’s more like…pre-ordering the product before it’s even made! So make sure the product is going to be a good one.


#2 Don’t skimp on design or copy

Mockups are hugely important because they establish trust with your backers. That being said, don’t advertise your product as something sleek and clean if it’s actually rugged and tough. Often, providing great visuals can strike a positive chord in potential backers and help them connect to your project. Images work in a way that sometimes, the text doesn’t.

That being said, don’t just post images and expect people to be wowed. It’s best to have a great story or message behind your project, one that’s bigger than you. If your backers can unite behind a shared vision or idea, they’re more likely to 1) fund it, and 2) share it with their friends.


#3 Share your project with relevant blogs

Chances are, if you’re a game developer, you know a few bloggers or video game writers. Try sharing the news of your project with them. If they’re keen on your idea, they might write about your project and share it with their followers.

This also goes for your friends and family, local board game club, you name it. Share the news and get the word out. Just don’t share the news so much that they get sick of you. This is probably the most important part of the crowdfunding process: you could have the most gorgeous project ever, but it won’t mean anything if no one sees it. Kind of like that quote, “If a tree falls in the forest but no one is around to hear it, does it still make a sound?”


#4 Keep your backers in the loop

The first thing you should do is create some awesome rewards. Don’t price them too high or you’ll alienate your fanbase. Be honest about the costs and make reasonable estimates of what you think each step of the process (developments, designs, etc.) will cost. Then, set reasonable goals and make fun rewards. People like to read funny things, and they love catching inside jokes so the rewards section would be a great place to get a little cheeky.

Don’t forget to post those updates, either. An update at least once a month or every few months should go without saying–don’t be like those huge failed Kickstarters that went radio silent for months on end only to cancel way later. When you include your backers on the journey and ship out the finished product to them, they’ll (hopefully) have good memories of the experience. It’ll be a story they can remember fondly for their whole life. Regular updates and thank you e-mails go a long way, and are arguably just as important as physical rewards!


#5 Plan before you launch

There are a lot of steps to a Kickstarter. It’s tempting to just scrap things together and let things figure themselves out later, but that’s not the way to go when you’re dealing with a massive production.

If you plan on shipping out a CD or disk of your game, you’ll need to figure out how to carry out manufacturing and fulfillment. Are you going to turn to a Chinese factory? Who’s going to design the CD skin? Would you rather stick to a local producer? Accurately factor in the costs of shipping and manufacturing, and be ready to ship internationally to your worldwide backers. Make a checklist of steps that you need to take so that you can make sure the project is completed on time.


Okay, those are just a few quick tips that can help you get the most out of your Kickstarter or Indiegogo launch! I hope that if you’re planning on funding the next great game you:

1.) Have a smashing success and

2.) Tell me about it!

Let me know if I missed any crucial tips in the comments section! 🙂


Click here to read Rin Fizzle’s profile

DISCLAIMER: THE VIEWS AND OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN THIS POST ARE SOLELY THOSE OF THE AUTHOR. THESE VIEWS AND OPINIONS DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THOSE OF SALJACK ENTERPRISES, AND IT’S STAFF, AND ANY/ALL CONTRIBUTORS TO THE SALJACK ENTERPRISES WEBSITES. SALJACK ENTERPRISES MAKES NO WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION REGARDING, DOES NOT ENDORSE, IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH AND IS NOT IN ANY WAY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE LINKED WEBSITES OR ANY CONTENT THAT APPEARS ON IT. IF YOU DECIDE TO VISIT ANY LINKED WEBSITE, YOU DO SO AT YOUR OWN RISK, AND IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO REVIEW THE TERMS OF USE OF THE RELEVANT LINKED WEBSITE.

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24 thoughts on “Rin’s Room #34: Getting Your Game’s Kickstarter Funded

  1. unvrso says:

    I have heard about KIckstarter; it would be a great project to have one´s own idea being developed into the next great game. There are lots of projects already, but who knows someone comes with the next great gaming plan

    Like

  2. mchesk16 says:

    These are some very solid points. It’s important to make your Kickstarter personable and visually appealing.

    Like

  3. Thanks to Indiegogo and Kickstarter, they have provided funding for games that are in progress to be made. It helps when you get a popular gamer to get the word out. I did invest in an Ingiegogo project before and until this day haven’t gotten my game so I haven’t invested since.

    Like

  4. Chatingale says:

    This is a good chance for creative game developers out there to shine. Let your ideas be put into action and grab this challenge.

    Like

  5. titanierza says:

    A good point would be ” BE RESONABLE” Aim for reasonable target so that it will be easy to reach. I have seen a Kickstarter. I am planning to make one myself.

    Like

  6. alexsummers123 says:

    This is definitely an option for those who are rookies on the game. I think if you want to go to the next level a KICK STARTER backed up by actual funding is okay. After all a KICKSTARTER is a gamble pretty much.

    Like

  7. valine13 says:

    Thank you for sharing this. It will us newbies in learning more on this.

    Like

  8. darkkvader says:

    Planning before launch is very essential. everything has to be prepared for before release. you wont know whats going to happen with the budget.

    Like

  9. Mau says:

    Your third point (share your project with relevant blogs) is spot on. It really helps to have the word out especially if you are new to the industry. You could have the best idea in the world but not get the results you wanted if you do not market your products correctly.

    Like

  10. These are workable tips. I can see it very applicable to me for my new project.

    Like

  11. roddyw says:

    The beauty of these tips is that they can be applied whether you’re launching some innovative product or selling some techie marvel. For the most part, I see folks funding random stuff that show a lot of potential on Kickstarter.

    Like

  12. charleenmae says:

    Bringing your ideas into reality is the dream. You need to show that your game isnt only good but it can compete with the legendary games. Thus making it worthy being funded.

    Like

  13. rob3rtow says:

    A game developer today certainly is lucky on so many levels. On top of why that is may be the fact that their concept could easily get funded by random folks via Indiegogo or Kickstarter. Back in the day, this concept is practically unheard of :/

    Like

  14. Great tips Rin! Having a kickstarter account has a lot of duties and responsibilities. A gamer who is really serious about setting up one should think thoroughly and be physical and mentally prepared.

    Like

  15. kulengs says:

    This is great news to anyone out there who needs funding. This is the first time I heard about Kickstarter and I support their cause.

    Like

  16. How do I get to support these? I do not know donating a dollar will do but the question is how? This is not even a public info for companies.

    Like

  17. micorobin says:

    Patreon will be an alternative but the thing is. I do not know if these newbies can wait that long because there is no telling how donations will go. I recommend having a Plan B just in case.

    Like

  18. garymick344 says:

    Ain’t it sad that some of the biggest name in the gaming industry that have projects on Kickstarter, Indiegogo aren’t even following all these pieces of advice? Not gonna name names but I’ve seen it and it sucks when you know that they’re practically milking off their reputation in the industry.

    Like

  19. califrank says:

    Got a great video game in mind? Here’s an idea: get a marketing guy! Because nope, your blueprints and drafts won’t entice anyone on Kickstarter save for fellow developers like yourself. Ha ha ha

    Like

  20. wokerful says:

    Thanks for all of the information; I knew that there are some sites that help get the funds for starting a project. It´s good to have Kickstarter for those who would create game applications

    Like

  21. kittyprydexmen says:

    How do you even start a campaign in KICKSTARTER? Apparently that info is missing here. Perhaps I just missed it.

    Like

  22. nightcrawlerxmen says:

    I am planning a KICKSTARTER at least in a smaller scale. It is good to have this tips as a guide for my campaign if ever it pushes through.

    Like

  23. zak413 says:

    Ohhh… some great pieces of advice for budding game developers out there! You’ve done a great job here, Rin. Thank you~

    Like

  24. hals3y says:

    I’m just nitpicking… but what has a fist busting through a laptop got to do with funding, Kickstarter, or anything this article is talking about?

    Like

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